Oh My Lord

The end of October/early November is going to be a busy busy time.

Oct. 27th - Start a new block in med school.
Oct. 29th - Fly to the Bay Area. Catch up on things I missed.
Oct. 30th - Deliver a talk at Stanford School of Medicine on medical education, technology, and culture shift. (If that kind of stuff interests you, register for this FREE Stanford course. You’ll see me talk!)
Oct. 31st - Fly back to Portland and catch up on school work.
Nov. 1st - Go to University of Oregon v. Stanford football game.
Nov. 2nd - Drive back to Portland. Catch up on school work. Study butt off.
Nov. 3rd - Resume studying butt off.
Nov. 4th - Take a test on things I studied my butt off on (officially the most awkward sentence I’ve ever written).
Nov. 5th - Continue studying butt off.
Nov. 10th - Pretend like I’m a doctor at an OSCE.
Nov. 11th - Furiously study butt off.
Nov. 12th - Take another test on things I studied by butt off on. Immediately collapse after turning in test and proceed to nap on lecture hall floor while sobbing tears of sweet joy.

It’s a miracle I’m surviving medical school without coffee.

Though I am just finishing high school, my thoughts are concrete about choosing medicine as a profession. What criteria would one consider for choosing the right undergrad school & relevant major to pursue medicine?

Asked by Anonymous

When considering pursuing medicine so young, there are a number of criteria that I would consider - support services, matriculation success, and location to name a few. 

Interestingly enough, my start up, Lean On, is adding a medical student who knew he wanted to do medicine right out of high school. He can provide you with first hand knowledge of what the process is like and advise you on the right course of action! If you’re interested, check out Lean On and set up a Skype Sesh!

Have a question? Ask away!

I'm planning to take USMLE step 1 any time soon, I know that it needs a years of preparations,I heard about books as "first aid" and watched videos as "Kaplan" , can you tell me the best way to study for it and any advice please? Thank you

Asked by Anonymous

From what I’ve heard so far, the go-to study method is First Aid plus all the question banks you can get your hands on (USMLE-Rx, Kaplan, UWorld). Repetition with questions will make you more comfortable with the test itself. 

As far as a year of preparation is concerned, I don’t think you need to be worrying that far ahead. People get serious about studying for the Step 1 about 3 months ahead of their test date. Until then, focus on your classes, because you’ll be studying for Step 1 just by studying your normal coursework.

If you need something more structured, Doctors-In-Training or Cram Fighter can generate a scheduled review process for you. Hope that helps. 

Have a question? Ask away!

Edit: I was also told via Twitter by @jonodoc to include Pathoma and the Goljan lectures.

Trinkets and heirlooms passed on from generations before. Perhaps it was a old wooden baseball bat, a faded trading card safely wrapped in cellophane, a scratchy record of The Beatles, but it was something; a tangible piece of familial lore."Your grandfather was here when…", "I caught this when…", "This reminds me of…"
Stories reified.
My parents moved from India to the Midwest and survived arctic winters in half of a garage, uninsulated from nature’s unforgiving chill, working through college in the hopes of a better job. They moved to California and started a family. For a spell, our collective wealth was zero; my father hadn’t a penny to his name. From there we grew, in number, in success, in respect; the American dream realized. Growing apart from family in India, however, there were no hand-me-downs that passed from one to the next.
Trinkets and heirlooms. My friends had many, passed on from generations before - a part of their family history made tangible, and, somehow, more meaningful; as if each piece were a monument to a life lived.
I didn’t have one of those monuments to honor the story of my family. That is, until now. My father gave this watch to me, one of the first watches he ever owned. It’s an uncomplicated watch that simply tells the time. No date, no glow-in-the-dark marks, no connectivity via bluetooth to my smartphone so its seamlessly connected to the cloud. It’s just a watch.
I was soon obsessed with the story behind this watch. After unsuccessfully interrogating him about its significance, I realized something. It really doesn’t matter what the story of that watch is. As the recipient of what will be my very first heirloom, I get to decide what its story is to my child.
I get to tell him that when I was 24, my father gave this to me and that’s why I’m giving it to you now on your 24th. I get to tell her that it encapsulates the time your grandfather spent building a foundation for our family here, and that, even if it’s a man’s watch, you should wear it proudly. I get to say that in this age of advanced digital ubiquity, take a moment to look down and reflect on your simple analog roots.
And breathe. Because as hard as life seems right now, you will grow.
You too will become a titan in your own way, like your grandfather before you. High-res

Trinkets and heirlooms passed on from generations before. Perhaps it was a old wooden baseball bat, a faded trading card safely wrapped in cellophane, a scratchy record of The Beatles, but it was something; a tangible piece of familial lore.

"Your grandfather was here when…", "I caught this when…", "This reminds me of…"

Stories reified.

My parents moved from India to the Midwest and survived arctic winters in half of a garage, uninsulated from nature’s unforgiving chill, working through college in the hopes of a better job. They moved to California and started a family. For a spell, our collective wealth was zero; my father hadn’t a penny to his name. From there we grew, in number, in success, in respect; the American dream realized. Growing apart from family in India, however, there were no hand-me-downs that passed from one to the next.

Trinkets and heirlooms. My friends had many, passed on from generations before - a part of their family history made tangible, and, somehow, more meaningful; as if each piece were a monument to a life lived.

I didn’t have one of those monuments to honor the story of my family. That is, until now. My father gave this watch to me, one of the first watches he ever owned. It’s an uncomplicated watch that simply tells the time. No date, no glow-in-the-dark marks, no connectivity via bluetooth to my smartphone so its seamlessly connected to the cloud. It’s just a watch.

I was soon obsessed with the story behind this watch. After unsuccessfully interrogating him about its significance, I realized something. It really doesn’t matter what the story of that watch is. As the recipient of what will be my very first heirloom, I get to decide what its story is to my child.

I get to tell him that when I was 24, my father gave this to me and that’s why I’m giving it to you now on your 24th. I get to tell her that it encapsulates the time your grandfather spent building a foundation for our family here, and that, even if it’s a man’s watch, you should wear it proudly. I get to say that in this age of advanced digital ubiquity, take a moment to look down and reflect on your simple analog roots.

And breathe. Because as hard as life seems right now, you will grow.

You too will become a titan in your own way, like your grandfather before you.

© The Biopsy 2012 - present