Trinkets and heirlooms passed on from generations before. Perhaps it was a old wooden baseball bat, a faded trading card safely wrapped in cellophane, a scratchy record of The Beatles, but it was something; a tangible piece of familial lore."Your grandfather was here when…", "I caught this when…", "This reminds me of…"
Stories reified.
My parents moved from India to the Midwest and survived arctic winters in half of a garage, uninsulated from nature’s unforgiving chill, working through college in the hopes of a better job. They moved to California and started a family. For a spell, our collective wealth was zero; my father hadn’t a penny to his name. From there we grew, in number, in success, in respect; the American dream realized. Growing apart from family in India, however, there were no hand-me-downs that passed from one to the next.
Trinkets and heirlooms. My friends had many, passed on from generations before - a part of their family history made tangible, and, somehow, more meaningful; as if each piece were a monument to a life lived.
I didn’t have one of those monuments to honor the story of my family. That is, until now. My father gave this watch to me, one of the first watches he ever owned. It’s an uncomplicated watch that simply tells the time. No date, no glow-in-the-dark marks, no connectivity via bluetooth to my smartphone so its seamlessly connected to the cloud. It’s just a watch.
I was soon obsessed with the story behind this watch. After unsuccessfully interrogating him about its significance, I realized something. It really doesn’t matter what the story of that watch is. As the recipient of what will be my very first heirloom, I get to decide what its story is to my child.
I get to tell him that when I was 24, my father gave this to me and that’s why I’m giving it to you now on your 24th. I get to tell her that it encapsulates the time your grandfather spent building a foundation for our family here, and that, even if it’s a man’s watch, you should wear it proudly. I get to say that in this age of advanced digital ubiquity, take a moment to look down and reflect on your simple analog roots.
And breathe. Because as hard as life seems right now, you will grow.
You too will become a titan in your own way, like your grandfather before you. High-res

Trinkets and heirlooms passed on from generations before. Perhaps it was a old wooden baseball bat, a faded trading card safely wrapped in cellophane, a scratchy record of The Beatles, but it was something; a tangible piece of familial lore.

"Your grandfather was here when…", "I caught this when…", "This reminds me of…"

Stories reified.

My parents moved from India to the Midwest and survived arctic winters in half of a garage, uninsulated from nature’s unforgiving chill, working through college in the hopes of a better job. They moved to California and started a family. For a spell, our collective wealth was zero; my father hadn’t a penny to his name. From there we grew, in number, in success, in respect; the American dream realized. Growing apart from family in India, however, there were no hand-me-downs that passed from one to the next.

Trinkets and heirlooms. My friends had many, passed on from generations before - a part of their family history made tangible, and, somehow, more meaningful; as if each piece were a monument to a life lived.

I didn’t have one of those monuments to honor the story of my family. That is, until now. My father gave this watch to me, one of the first watches he ever owned. It’s an uncomplicated watch that simply tells the time. No date, no glow-in-the-dark marks, no connectivity via bluetooth to my smartphone so its seamlessly connected to the cloud. It’s just a watch.

I was soon obsessed with the story behind this watch. After unsuccessfully interrogating him about its significance, I realized something. It really doesn’t matter what the story of that watch is. As the recipient of what will be my very first heirloom, I get to decide what its story is to my child.

I get to tell him that when I was 24, my father gave this to me and that’s why I’m giving it to you now on your 24th. I get to tell her that it encapsulates the time your grandfather spent building a foundation for our family here, and that, even if it’s a man’s watch, you should wear it proudly. I get to say that in this age of advanced digital ubiquity, take a moment to look down and reflect on your simple analog roots.

And breathe. Because as hard as life seems right now, you will grow.

You too will become a titan in your own way, like your grandfather before you.

I want to start a med/health related blog as a premed in order to better understand issues that concern healthcare on a national and global arena. However, I am unsure of where to begin. The diversity of topics and breadth are immense and overwhelming. Right now, I have only written fiction/poetry in relation to health and medicine. I'm afraid that I could misinform others if my interpretations of certain things are wrong. How did you start writing, and what motivates you to continue?

Asked by Anonymous

I think the best advice I would have to offer you would be in the gestalt of the following three posts:
Apart from those, some concrete tips to get you started with your blog include:
- Brainstorm a unique name and URL that people will remember. Make it brief, but impactful.
- Invest in making that your brand name across all social media profiles. 
- Plug into the right social media networks to find ideas to write about. 
- Don’t worry about being the next Shakespeare or Vonnegut. Just start writing; it’ll get better with practice. 
- If you are wrong, that’s fine. The folks on the internet will correct you. Don’t take it personally. Learn from it and move on. 
I hope that helps, anon! Have a question for me? Ask away!

This may be a stupid question... How can a high school student learn about study efficiency? Do you have any study methods for me, because I literally have no idea how to study. And I know that once med school and college come around I will definitely have to study.

Asked by thepocatomyhontas

You should ask ladykaymd about this. Her FAQ section on study tactics is quite helpful and widely disseminated amongst the Tumblr community. 

In high school, I didn’t really have a study method. I just did things and they seemed to work. If I had to pin down a study method, I would say I read things repeatedly? Maybe? High school was a long time ago and my memory is blurry.

Any other medblrs out there with high school study tips?

Feel free to keep asking questions, folks!

I am medical student around to finish Med school. so i like to travel to USA to get USMLE's InShallah. But I am wondering if the medical society there will accept me as I am with covering face or not !!! .. do you know any muslim doctor around you covering her face.. i know its silly Q but i need to know the answer .. Thank you

Asked by Anonymous

As-salam alaykum, reader. There are plenty of Muslim medical students and physicians in the US who learn, teach, and practice medicine with their heads covered. A full head and face covering (as with a Niqab or Burqa), however, would probably not be okay since your patients and colleagues will need to see your face. A cover for your hair would be acceptable though. Something like this would work really well:

image

Have a question for me? Ask away.

A couple of notes about this video:

  • Siblings can make this experience way worse than it has to be. The brother at the beginning basically said her shot is going to hurt and she has what amounts to an anxiety attack.
  • The amount of emotions being cycled through this video is mind-boggling.
  • I hope this girl comes back for her boosters after this. 
  • Thank you nurses for being able to do this so calmly. That is currently not within my purview of skills. (Truth be told, my reaction was the same as the boy’s. I am a terrible person.)  
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